Targeting misfolded proteins

Misfolded proteins

Proclara takes a novel approach to treating protein misfolding diseases, based on the fact that many toxic aggregates of misfolded proteins share a common characteristic – the amyloid protein fold – that represents a unique target for drug development.

Proclara scientists have developed a novel proprietary technology known as GAIM, or General Amyloid Interaction Motif, that simultaneously targets multiple misfolded proteins implicated in both neurodegenerative and progressive peripheral diseases, potentially creating a more robust response that could be suitable for patients at all stages of disease.

LEARN MORE: Proclara Biosciences


Tony Wyss-Coray

Tony Wyss-Coray

Tony Wyss-Coray, D. H. Chen Distinguished Professor of Neurology and Neurological Sciences at Stanford University, is the Co-Director of the Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, and Senior Research Career Scientist at the Palo Alto VA. His lab studies brain aging and neurodegeneration with a focus on age-related cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

The Wyss-Coray research team discovered that circulatory blood factors can modulate brain structure and function and factors from young organisms can rejuvenate old brains. These findings were voted 2nd place Breakthrough of the Year in 2014 by Science Magazine and presented in talks at Global TED, the World Economic Forum, and Google Zeitgeist.

Wyss-Coray is the recipient of an NIH Director’s Pioneer Award, a Zenith Award from the Alzheimer’s Association, a NOMIS Foundation Award, an inventor on multiple patents, and was selected by TIME Magazine to “The Health Care 50” as one of the most influential people transforming healthcare in 2018.






Plasma-based strategies for brain aging

Abstract

Age is the primary risk factor for the vast majority of disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases impacting brain function. Whether the consequences of aging at the biological level can be reversed, or age-related changes prevented, to change the trajectory of such disorders is thus of extreme interest and value.

Studies using young plasma, the acellular component of blood, have demonstrated that aging is malleable, with the ability to restore functions in old animals. Fascinatingly, this functional improvement is even observed in the brain, despite the blood-brain barrier, indicating that peripheral sources can effectively impact central sites leading to clinically relevant changes such as enhancement of cognitive function.

A plasma-based approach is also attractive as aging is inherently complex, with an array of mechanisms dysregulated in diverse cells and organs throughout the body leading to disturbed function. Plasma, containing a natural mixture of components, has the ability to act multimodally, modulating diverse mechanisms that can converge to change the trajectory of age-related diseases.

Here we review the evidence that plasma modulates aging processes in the brain and consider the therapeutic applications that derive from these observations. Plasma and plasma-derived therapeutics are an attractive translation of this concept, requiring critical consideration of benefits, risks, and ethics. Ultimately, knowledge derived from this science will drive a comprehensive molecular understanding to deliver optimized therapeutics. The potential of highly differentiated, multimodal therapeutics for treatment of age-related brain disorders provides an exciting new clinical approach to address the complex etiology of aging.

FULL TEXT: Neurotherapeutics