CohBar

Mitochondrial-derived peptides

CohBar is a clinical stage biotechnology company focused on the research and development of mitochondria based therapeutics. Mitochondria based therapeutics originate from the discovery by CohBar’s founders of a novel group of naturally occurring mitochondrial-derived peptides within the mitochondrial genome that regulate metabolism and cell death, and whose biological activity declines with age.

To date, the company has discovered more than 100 mitochondrial derived peptides and generated over 1,000 analogs. CohBar’s efforts focus on the development of these peptides into therapeutics that offer the potential to address a broad range of diseases.


BioAge platform

Identifying key drug targets

The BioAge platform identifies key drug targets that will impact aging. The company’s proprietary human aging cohorts have blood samples collected up to 45 years ago, with participant -omics data that is tied to extensive medical follow-up records including detailed future healthspan, lifespan, and disease outcomes.

We have built a systems biology and AI platform that leverages these rich datasets to identify the molecular drivers of age-related pathology. Our pipeline of therapies targeting these key pathways will address the significant unmet medical needs of an aging population.

READ MORE: BioAge




Antisense therapy

Turning a gene ‘off’

Antisense therapy is a form of treatment for genetic disorders or infections. When the genetic sequence of a particular gene is known to cause a particular disease, it is sometimes possible to synthesize a strand of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA or a chemical analogue) that will bind to the messenger RNA (mRNA) produced by that gene and inactivate it, effectively turning that gene “off”.

This is because mRNA has to be single stranded for it to be translated. Alternatively, the strand might be targeted to bind a splicing site on pre-mRNA and modify the exon content of an mRNA. Antisense therapies are not gene therapies, and should be considered RNA-based drug discovery, as it has only a few elements in common with gene therapy.

Because nucleases that cleave the phosphodiester linkage in DNA are expressed in almost every cell, unmodified DNA molecules are generally degraded before they reach their targets. Therefore, antisense drug candidate molecules are generally modified during the drug discovery phase of their development.

Intracellular targets

Most targets of antisense are located inside cells, and getting nucleic acids across cell membranes is also difficult. Therefore, most clinical candidates have modified DNA “backbones”, or the nucleobase or sugar moieties of the nucleotides are altered. Additionally, other molecules may be conjugated to antisense molecules in order to improve their ability to target certain cells or to cross barriers like cell membranes or the blood brain barrier.

MORE: Wikipedia